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Collection Intervention


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#1 milwaukeemachineman

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Posted 15 August 2012 - 01:19 PM

Saw the show can't wait till they get to a Robot Collection, so what do you guys or gals think of the show?

mmm
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#2 dratomic

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Posted 15 August 2012 - 02:00 PM

Generally, I thought the show was okay, but not that great. I understand the premise is that when people's collections get out of control, the show comes in to help them reel it in. But I wish they'd spent a little more time talking about key pieces, proper ways to display the good stuff, etc. I wish they'd focused more on celebrating the collections and collectors.

I also know there was a lot of drama created in the editing bay... As to be expected, but still...

I'm friendly with the Star Wars collector on last night's episode, and she told me that it was a REASONABLY fair presentation of things, but she was surprised to see how the show portrayed her husband: Apparently, he's a HUGE Star Wars fan, just as big as she is. While she's a bigger collector, he LOVES the stuff in their collection. The show instead portrayed him as being kind of cold towards all the stuff. Not true at all.

Also, the show never mentioned that the money raised in the auction was donated to Rancho Obi-Wan, the museum/collection owned by Steve Sansweet (and now an official non-profit).

So all in all, I wasn't horrified by the show, but I don't think I'll bother watching it again. Personally, I'd love to see a program that introduces people to different collections, explains why they're cool, talks about the history, etc. etc. etc. I'm tired of shows that only show collections as problems needing to be solved.

Edited by dratomic, 16 August 2012 - 12:48 PM.

Brian
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#3 Morbius

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Posted 15 August 2012 - 02:12 PM

There was recently a de-cluttering show (don't recall the name) where whenever the host encountered a 'collection' by a 'collector' such as Star Wars/Trek, Barbies etc. those items were generally the first to be discarded as it was always considered trivial crap by the host, that it just takes up space and has no 'useful' purpose in day-to-day living. Those kind of shows are horrible to watch through.

I agree Dr. A. that we haven't come close to a show which actually shows the caretaking and proper display of key items, maybe there's not enough drama in such instances.

Michael D. Le Blanc
 

 

"Sanity is the playground of the unimaginative."


#4 Joe K.

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Posted 15 August 2012 - 03:52 PM

.
I'm reminded of Charlie Brown's annual exclaimation after Lucy would snatch away that football:

AAUGH!

Let's hope tonight's debut episode of Toy Hunter is better.
.
Joe Knedlhans - Owner/Curator
The Toy Robot Museum @ Stoudtburg Village
Adamstown, Pennsylvania

#5 Andyman

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Posted 15 August 2012 - 05:52 PM

So they're basically presenting this as a "hoarders" show only with collections? I'll tell you what...there seems to be a very fine line between collecting and hoarding. I couldn't begin to guess where that line is with anybody.

#6 Phil R

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Posted 15 August 2012 - 08:33 PM

I think that Brian did a great job on his analysis of the show. Unfortunately, the people who put these shows together don't do enough research into the psychology of why people collect anything. In my case it's almost always an event that occurred sometime in my past that made a major impression to further collecting. I know that to be a major factor in most individual's collecting. That was a focus of the Stars Wars segments. However, outside people still can't grasp that reasoning. I've begun to reduce my collections over the past 5 or more years, some as much as 50%-75%. But, I could not have done that years ago in my 50s.
Phil Redman, York, PA

#7 Tinman

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 11:53 AM

Yeah, I'm not sure I'll watch it again because I gained nothing for my 45 minutes. I'm emotionally connected to my collection but not in the same way as the Star Wars collector, she was a tad extreme (ok maybe more than a tad) in her feelings for the objects. I'm also very suspicious of the monetary amount offered for her small stack of action figures, that's crazy money. No dealer would pay that much out of HIS pocket when loose vintage figures may sell as low as $3 to $5 each. I understand the offer was made to highlight her obsession but I think it also gives people a false sense of the prices Star Wars items can bring. Many people still believe Star Wars = big money, and shows like this only adds to the myth.
Bill P.

#8 dratomic

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 12:50 PM

Well... Some SW still brings a LOT of money, and we don't know what, exactly, was in the pile of figures. Even "average" figures can do well -- a mint R2 can bring $25-$35. A Power of the Force R2 with lightsaber can go for $75, a farmboy Luke (the figure from A New Hope) runs about $40... So the numbers add up if you've got nice pieces. The guy offering the money, Brian Flynn, is a really knowledgable collector (I've interviewed him, and I've written for Super7 magazine when it still existed) and I don't think he'd damage his own reputation by offering too much money for stuff that's not worth it. That said... The show did a bad job of making people understand why he was offering that kind of money.

BTW, the little "factoid" that popped on the screen re: the price of a Darth Vader with the "telescoping" lightsaber was a bit misleading. The show reported its value at something like $4K. The problem is, the toy needs to have the DOUBLE telescoping lightsaber, which was an early version that didn't last very long on the stands. That thing goes for a fortune. Vader with a standard telescoping lightsaber is worth maybe $15 or something. :)

Brian
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