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LILLIPUT ROBOT - MAIN RESEARCH

248 posts in this topic

A closer look at these two examples reveals the subtle, minor differences between them.

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SPONGEBOT SPONGEBOT SPONGEBOT

Ken please don´t make such jokes. I´m nearly dying by laughing.

Now I know what I´m missing the last months. The pain by split my sides laughing.

My idea: Take away Lilliputs head and paint him like spongebob. Perfect.

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The super rare Fireman Lilliput. ( Breaking the rules here, but what the heck, its a 'buy it now' if you want it.

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Congratulations to the winner of the Lilliput!! (you lucky dog! ;) ) This is one of my top three most wanted robots that I actually may have a shot at owning one day. This was a really nice looking example too. If I were in a "buying mode" at the moment I might have gone all out for this one. The "socks" seem legitimate to me also. If someone was faking a robot why would they introduce an irregular detail that would be bound to attract attention as it has? I think it's most likely completely original.

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Fin, its also in my top 3 most wanted (actually could be possible to own one day - but not now!) robots. My other 2 'are er are' gosh I can't make my mine up <_<

Clunk

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On Lilliput´s chest is printed the character " N.P. 5357 ".

I´ve had always the strong feeling that this was a hidden hint but what was the meaning?

Since Volker had posted this thread on Alpha: Liliput Robot

we do know that the production date of Lilliput was 1937.

Well on his chest appears 5357.

I´m not sure if this is a hint to the production date - perhaps it is, perhaps not.

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But after doing some research now I´m quite sure of the meaning of N.P.

Perhaps you know the other word of Japan - it is Nippon or Nihon like the Japanese say.

It is represented as the two japanese letters: "Ni" and "Hon". In our letters it is NP.

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How high is the probability that N.P. represents Nippon or Japan?

Our alphabet has 26 letters. The number of combinations of two letters from AA, AB, AC up to YZ and ZZ is 26 x 26 = 676! :excl:

The chance that N.P. was only taken by accident is 1 to 676 or 0,148%.

Here is a link to Wikipedia:Names of Japan

Lilliput was produced before WWII and the Japanese was a proud nation.

So why should N.P. on Lilliput´s chest not mean Nippon?

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Make sense to me. I think the holy grail of all catalog sightings would be a Lilliput.

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Hi Freuds,

I had a good hard long stare at my 2 again and I think the reference to Japan is absolutely spot on. NP is a common reference to Japan (Nippon - Ni Hon).

However the numbers are elusive. The rule of Emperor Showa Tenno (Hirohito to the Americans here) was 1926 to 1989. The Japanese date according to the years of the emperors rule... Showa 10 is 1936 in gaijin speak.... so... i was thinking 5 + 3 + 5+ 7... but this doesn't quite make sense.

I've managed to turn up some pearls of information on the ARMs... god did that take some digging!!! but I reckon this one is worth of a Quest!!!!

Let me go over it with a microscope and relook at all the trademarks, symbols and tags!!

Ev

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I think it all has to do with the Da Vinci code..Or I think Nostradamus mentions it somewhere.. B) :D

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Troubling news on the Liliput history topic. It seems he was developed by the nefarious Unit 731 and was used to preform attrocities for the Japanese Military. Also he was not a true robot but a cyborg, hence the need of a oxygen hose during chemical warfare experiments. :(

Unit 731 (大日本帝国陸軍第731 部隊) was a covert biological warfare research and development unit of the Imperial Japanese Army that undertook lethal human experimentation during the Second Sino-Japanese War (1937–1945) and World War II.

1937!

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Phew!!The plot thickens!!!!!!! :blink:

Plasticaugie,,,,,,,Nice work.......Love the attachments. :lol:

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Very disturbing news Plasticaugie -your evidence is very disheartening!!! :unsure:

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Think N.P. would stand for Number of Production (i.e., Production Number), not Nippon. My two cents.. thanks.

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In computational complexity theory, NP is one of the most fundamental complexity classes. The abbreviation NP refers to "Non-deterministic Polynomial time".

Intuitively, NP contains all decision problems for which the 'yes'-answers have simple proofs of the fact that the answer is indeed 'yes'. More precisely, these proofs have to be verifiable in polynomial time by a deterministic Turing machine. In an equivalent formal definition, NP is the set of decision problems solvable in polynomial time by a non-deterministic Turing machine.

The complexity class P is contained in NP, but NP contains many important problems, called NP-complete problems, for which no polynomial-time algorithms are known. The most important open question in complexity theory, the P = NP problem, asks whether such algorithms actually exist for NP-complete problems. It is widely believed that this is not the case.

Problem solved...simple!

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Ken -actually a careful application of all the casual antecedents solves all NP problems!!!

I believe Eastend hit upon a 'reasonable' meaning for N.P.

Here is some of my very early thoughts on Lilliput which might be topical here: let's examine the companies behind the two trademarks on his box. Unfortunately "KT" is shrouded in as much mystery as Lilliput. This trademark appears on a number of prewar japanese toy boxes-usually in conjunction with another trademark. My guess is they were perhaps the actual manufacturer for the main toy companies such as Masudaya. Eastend - any ideas????

The other trademark-C.K.(Kuramochi Shoten)appears on the box lid with the wording-"sole supplier of made in Japan". They were probaly the biggest Japanese prewar toy company. They didn't fare too well after the war-becoming a tier two firm. After the war two of their employees fearing the total demise of the company left to form Alps and Nomura. (info courtesy of William Gallagher)

Lilliput also uses a keywind system which contains a 1930's Japan patent date. This dating is consistent with the showa dating as pointed out by Evanism.

Now I bring this up because the number 5357 is quite a high number. If NP indeed stands for a production number - I would think this would perhaps be a C.K. company number as they put out an endless stream of prewar Japanese toys.

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In computational complexity theory, NP is one of the most fundamental complexity classes. The abbreviation NP refers to "Non-deterministic Polynomial time".

Intuitively, NP contains all decision problems for which the 'yes'-answers have simple proofs of the fact that the answer is indeed 'yes'. More precisely, these proofs have to be verifiable in polynomial time by a deterministic Turing machine. In an equivalent formal definition, NP is the set of decision problems solvable in polynomial time by a non-deterministic Turing machine.

The complexity class P is contained in NP, but NP contains many important problems, called NP-complete problems, for which no polynomial-time algorithms are known. The most important open question in complexity theory, the P = NP problem, asks whether such algorithms actually exist for NP-complete problems. It is widely believed that this is not the case.

Problem solved...simple!

So....NP=No Problem? ;)

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